within / without

I’ve been going on and on about the show and now it’s gone and passed, and I haven’t said a word about it.

As you probably already know, it was in two parts – from the 31st of March to the 6th of April and from the 7th to the 13th of April. We tried to make sure the people whose work would be up at the same time related with one another in some way and we found out that a lot of our works do that anyway. As almost everyone was exhibiting work that was part of their final year project (for the degree show in May) it was an amazing opportunity to experience the curatorial side of the whole ‘Encounter’ challenge. We found more connections between our work than we previously thought and also received amazing feedback on and after both opening nights.

My own work had nothing to do with my final project, which was probably not the best of ideas, but I wanted to focus on something fresh in my mind – at the time I still wasn’t sure whether I wanted to do an animation for my final piece or a very long scroll-type painting on a large scale. Neither would have worked well in the gallery space at Paper Arts, so in the end I chose the subject which had ceaselessly been on my mind since the Christmas holidays – DREAMS.

I’d been having a series of very vivid and realistic dreams with massive amounts of detail stored in my memories. I wouldn’t say that they influenced my waking life but I’ve always thought that if someone is in your dream, you have to tell them. A number of people were in my dreams, one person in particular, who also appears in the final images, more so than the others – when I shared my dreams with him, it became a common conversation topic, and a really exciting one at that, which brought us closer and solidified our friendship, something I was immensely happy about. So, in a sense, they actually did influence my waking life.

IMG_1224
left to right: Jakeem Lee, Sara Christova (me), Jack Coles, Sophie Holbeche, Patrick Howells, Ayu Baker and Rhiannon Parnis. Unfortunately Heather Kirk couldn’t make it that evening. (photo by Emma Harry, additional edit by me)

Anyway, I shouldn’t go off on a tangent. The opening night for the second week was a lovely event which I thoroughly enjoyed. I got very positive feedback from our year tutor, Amelia, who believed I should go on with this for my final piece. That completely threw me off and I found myself wide-eyed and panicking, telling her it actually has nothing to do with my final piece (even though I’d already been trying to find a way to relate dreams with myths). Her suggestion was that I should find a way to do something similar… ‘because it really does work very well, good job!’

IMG_1191Even though I didn’t sell any of the prints I had on display (I was gutted when I realised I’d forgotten mount board and cellophane pockets) I am really happy to have had the chance to have my work seen by so many people. Hopefully it will have inspired some of them to truly explore and experience their dreams. :)

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Personification: Rumpelstiltskin

I can only say that I had an incredible time doing this project. For so long I had forgotten what it was like to draw with black ink and just black ink and after I did the first couple of images, the rest felt like child’s play! Amelia did say this was going to be one of the hardest projects of the term and I can agree that parts of it proved quite difficult. For example, I believe that the hardest part of all was just setting the character-items into this world of setting/background-items. The very interaction between the two types of ‘inanimate’ objects, the proximity of one to the other (which is key to conveying the needed emotions), the relation of blacks and whites and contrast altogether in one object next to another (should they be similarly shaded in contrast to the background or should they contradict one another?) and, well, actually a lot of other things that one usually doesn’t think about consciously (like me).

But enough about that. The project is called Personification and this is Chapter I: Rumpelstiltskin.

Below you will see twelve images that illustrate the story. They are black and white images done with ink and pens (with the help of a Promarker here and there). I guess it would help if you find the story for yourself and read it, and it would be a fun exercise to try and figure out which is which, so, enjoy.

*Bear in mind that this is a Course Project.... any feedback and/or constructive criticism is warmly welcomed!!!*

 

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12

the end.